Simple Checklist Helps Students Manage Their Health for the First Time

Having a plan to stay healthy both physically and mentally can help make the college transition smoother

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India Carter, 18, gets a checkup at The Ohio State University Wilce Student Wellness Center. For many new college students, it’s the first time they’ve had to manage their own health, but stepping on campus with a plan can empower them to live a healthy lifestyle.

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) – About 20 million students begin college each fall and, for many of them, it’s the first time they’re on their own – taking sole responsibility for their academics, daily routine and, most importantly, their health. Preparing to take the reins of their own healthcare can be overwhelming, but a few simple preparations can help them make this important transition a smooth one.

“When students step on campus they really should find out where resources are that they might need – assistance with teaching and learning, the student health center and mental wellness resources,” said Bernadette Melnyk, chief wellness officer at The Ohio State University. “Knowing when to ask for help is critical, whether you’re having trouble with your classes or are facing a physical or mental health issue.”

Melnyk urges all new students to check off a few simple but crucial tasks before moving to school and to revisit them throughout the school year to keep students happier and healthier when moving out on their own for the first time:

  • Establish Healthy Habits – Just like you schedule your classes, schedule time for physical activity (at least 30 minutes of exercise five times a week), healthy eating, stress relief and at least seven hours of sleep every night. When you map out where your classes are on campus, also find your way to the places that will help you keep those healthy habits like the gym, a dining facility with healthy options and the student health center. 
  • Find Local Health Care – Get connected with a primary care nurse practitioner or physician and the nearest pharmacy. This is especially important for students who come to school with a chronic health condition, but every student could inevitably face a health challenge and should be prepared. Be sure to understand your insurance coverage before accessing care.
  • Make Your Mental Health a Priority – The pressures of school and new surroundings can be nerve-wracking for students. Stress, depression and anxiety are growing mental health challenges among college students. Getting involved in campus organizations helps you to start making friends right away and can go a long way toward reducing stress. If you’re feeling overwhelmed and it’s interfering with functioning, don’t wait to seek professional help
  • Find a System that Works for You – Whether it’s scheduling workouts and healthcare appointments in a planner or using apps on your phone to remind you to take medication, find a way to stay organized and proactive about your health and well-being.

Experts say new students should also establish healthy sleep habits and keep all-nighters to a minimum. You can download the college prep health checklist for the new college student in your life at  https://go.osu.edu/wellnesschecklist.

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India Carter, 18, gets a checkup at The Ohio State University Wilce Student Wellness Center. For many new college students, it’s the first time they’ve had to manage their own health, but stepping on campus with a plan can empower them to live a healthy lifestyle.

College freshman India Carter fills in the whiteboard calendar in her dorm room at The Ohio State University. Scheduling healthy habits just like she schedules her classwork helps her manage her health.

As chief wellness officer at The Ohio State University, Bernadette Melnyk urges students to come to campus armed with a plan to manage their health, a responsibility that many students are taking on the first time when they arrive on campus.

India Carter, 18, talks to a counselor at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Anxiety and depression are on the rise among college students, and experts say students should seek help as soon as they’re feeling stressed or overwhelmed.

India Carter, 18, works out in the Recreation and Physical Activity Center at The Ohio State University. Scheduling healthy habits just like they schedule classes can help college students maintain their health, something they are likely managing for the first time on their own.