For First Time, Heart Attack Info Is Female-Focused

American Heart Association publishes first statement on heart attacks in women

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Carmela Powers of Westerville, Ohio checks her blood pressure daily. Powers often suffered sudden jaw pain, but ignored it, not knowing it was a sign of serious heart problems. Years later she had three heart attacks within a matter of days.

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) – The American Heart Association has published an 87-page scientific statement, outlining the unique risks, symptoms and types of heart attacks women can experience. This is the first time a comprehensive document has been developed with female-specific information on heart attacks.

“Over the last decade or two we’ve begun to realize that women’s hearts are different than men’s, but we hadn’t compiled a list about what makes their symptoms, treatments and types of heart attacks different,” said Dr. Laxmi Mehta, a primary author of the document and the clinical director of the Women’s Cardiovascular Health Program at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. “This statement now provides a go-to document for physicians and healthcare providers that they can reference when caring for female patients before, during and after a heart attack.”

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Carmela Powers of Westerville, Ohio checks her blood pressure daily. Powers often suffered sudden jaw pain, but ignored it, not knowing it was a sign of serious heart problems. Years later she had three heart attacks within a matter of days.

Carmela Powers checks and records her blood pressure at her home in Westerville, Ohio. Like millions of other women, Powers was not aware of female-specific signs of heart problems, like jaw pain, and suffered three heart attacks in a matter of days after ignoring her symptoms for years.

Dr. Laxmi Mehta checks the heart of a female patient at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Mehta was a primary author on a scientific statement published by the American Heart Association, the first ever to compile female-specific information on heart attacks.

Carmela Powers, who suffered three heart attacks in a matter of days, now checks and records her heart rate and blood pressure daily at her home in Westerville, Ohio. Like many women, Powers was unaware of female-specific symptoms of heart attacks like jaw pain and ignored her symptoms for years.

Dr. Laxmi Mehta examines a patient at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Mehta was a primary author of a scientific statement recently published by the American Heart Association, the first ever to compile heart attack information specifically for women.