Study: Cars, Child Seats Not Compatible 42% Of Time

Researchers test 3,600 combinations, find seat angles, headrests cause improper fits

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Megan Murphy, of Hilliard, OH, had to stuff a pool noodle under her 2-year-old`s car seat to make it level, and a new study shows that`s a common issue. Researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine tested nearly 3,600 combinations using 59 car seats and 61 vehicle models. They found cars and car seats had compatibility issues nearly 42 percent of the time, forcing many parents like Murphy to improvise to make them fit properly. Details of the study here: bit.ly/1Jf7fHr

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) – A soon-to-be-released study suggests a surprising number of car seats don’t fit into vehicles properly, requiring many parents to resort to putting rolled up towels, blankets or pool noodles under the car seats to make them level.

Using dimensions from 59 car seat models and 61 vehicles, researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine analyzed nearly 3,600 potential combinations. “We found that about 42 percent of the time there were compatibility issues,” said Julie Bing, the research engineer who led the study. “The problem is the base of several rear-facing car seats are designed for different seat pan angles than most vehicles provide,” she said. An improper fit can cause children to ride in unsuitable positions and may raise the risk of injury.

Researchers also found headrests built into vehicle seats can interfere with forward-facing car seats. “If the headrest juts out too far, it doesn’t allow the back of the car seat to sit flush against the seat, especially in vehicles where the headrests cannot be adjusted or removed,” said Bing.

The study is to be published in October in the journal Traffic Injury Prevention.

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Megan Murphy puts a child safety seat in her van at her home in Hilliard, OH. Like many parents, Murphy had to use a pool noodle under her child`s car seat to make it level. A new study from The Ohio State University College of Medicine found incompatibility between cars and car seats are a common problem. Researchers analyzed nearly 3,600 combinations using 59 car seats and 61 vehicle models. They found car seats didn`t fit properly in vehicles nearly 42 percent of the time. Details: bit.ly/1Jf7fHr

Megan Murphy, of Hilliard, OH, had to stuff a pool noodle under her 2-year-old`s car seat to make it level, and a new study shows that`s a common issue. Researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine tested nearly 3,600 combinations using 59 car seats and 61 vehicle models. They found cars and car seats had compatibility issues nearly 42 percent of the time, forcing many parents like Murphy to improvise to make them fit properly. Details of the study here: bit.ly/1Jf7fHr

Julie Bing, a research engineer, analyzes the fit of a car seat at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. In a new study, Bing tested nearly 3,600 combinations using 59 car seats and 61 vehicle models. She found cars and car seats had compatibility issues nearly 42 percent of the time. To learn more about the study, click here: bit.ly/1Jf7fHr

A new study from The Ohio State University College of Medicine found car seats fit improperly in cars nearly 42 percent of the time. Julie Bing, a research engineer who led the study, analyzed 3,600 combinations of car seats and vehicles. Learn more about the study here: bit.ly/1Jf7fHr

Julie Bing, a research engineer at The Ohio State University College of Medicine, measures a car seat as part of a recent study on compatibility. Bing used 59 car seats and 61 vehicles to analyze nearly 3,600 combinations. She found that car seats fit improperly nearly 42 percent of the time, prompting many parents to stuff rolled towels, blankets and pool noodles under the seats to make them level. To learn more about the study, click here: bit.ly/1Jf7fHr