Cartilage Grown In Lab Implanted Into Man’s Knee

Doctors: the harvest, grow, implant procedure could change approach to knee injuries

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A surgeon at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center holds human cartilage that was grown in a laboratory moments before implanting the cartilage into a patient`s knee. The cartilage was made from cells that were harvested from a healthy part of the patient`s leg weeks earlier. Once it had grown to an appropriate size, doctors took the new cartilage from the laboratory and implanted it back into the patient`s own knee in an effort to heal his injured meniscus. See how the procedure works here: bit.ly/1gAK3MV

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) – Doctors are testing a novel approach to repairing damaged cartilage in the knee. They harvest healthy cartilage cells from a patient, use those cells to grow new cartilage in a laboratory, then implant it back into the patient’s knee in an effort to help it heal.

“Unfortunately when it comes to knee cartilage, once it’s damaged, it’s damaged. It doesn’t heal or regrow, and over time it can erode and lead to osteoarthritis,” said Dr. David C. Flanigan, an orthopaedic surgeon at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. “If this approach can help improve function and outcomes for patients, this may be the future of how we address cartilage problems,” he said.

Right now, surgeons operate to remove damaged cartilage from the knee, not repair it, so new options for treatment are desperately needed.

In the last decade, the number of surgeries for knee cartilage damage has shot up nearly 40 percent to almost a quarter of a million surgeries per year.

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A surgeon at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center holds human cartilage that was grown in a laboratory moments before implanting the cartilage into a patient`s knee. The cartilage was made from cells that were harvested from a healthy part of the patient`s leg weeks earlier. Once it had grown to an appropriate size, doctors took the new cartilage from the laboratory and implanted it back into the patient`s own knee in an effort to heal his injured meniscus. See how the procedure works here: bit.ly/1gAK3MV

Dr. David C. Flanigan prepares to implant human cartilage that was grown in a laboratory in an effort to repair the damaged knee of a patient at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Researchers extracted healthy cartilage cells from the patient weeks earlier, then sent those cells to a laboratory where they were used to grow new cartilage. Once the cartilage had grown large enough, surgeons re-implanted the tissue back onto the patient to try and repair his damaged knee. Details: bit.ly/1gAK3MV

Surgeons at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center implant lab-grown cartilage into Taylor Landgraf`s damaged knee. Weeks ago, doctors harvested cartilage cells from a healthy part of Landgraf`s knee and sent those cells to a lab where they grew into new tissue the size of a quarter. Surgeons then re-implanted the new cartilage in Landgraf`s knee to try and repair damage to his meniscus that he sustained during a recent fall. To see how the procedure could change knee surgery in the future, click here: bit.ly/1gAK3MV

A longboarding accident left Taylor Landgraf, 23, with a torn meniscus. Since cartilage in the knee doesn`t heal or regrow effectively, doctors are testing a new approach. After harvesting cells from a healthy part of Landgraf`s leg, scientists used those cells to grow new cartilage in a laboratory. Once the cartilage was big enough, surgeons at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center re-implanted it into Landgraf`s knee, using it to patch holes in his meniscus caused by the accident. To see how this experimental procedure works, click here: bit.ly/1gAK3MV

After Taylor Landgraf, 23, tore his meniscus, doctors at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center harvested cells from a healthy part of his leg, then used those cells to grow new cartilage in a laboratory. Once the cartilage had grown large enough, doctors took the tissue from the lab and re-implanted it into Landgraf`s knee in an effort to heal his injuries. Cartilage doesn`t heal or regrow inside the body effectively, which is why researchers want to see if cultivating it in a laboratory might offer new hope to the quarter of a million Americans who require knee surgery each year. Details: bit.ly/1gAK3MV

Surgeons at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center repair a man`s knee using cartilage that was grown in a laboratory. Doctors extracted cells from a healthy part of the patient`s leg weeks before, used those cells to grow new cartilage, then re-implanted the new cartilage into his injured knee. If it proves successful, the experimental procedure could provide new options for the quarter of a million Americans each year who require surgery on damaged knee cartilage. See how the procedure works here: bit.ly/1gAK3MV