Study: Young Kids With Autism Behave Better If Parents Are Trained

Parents who go through 24-week training program have children who behave better

Featured Video Play Icon

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)  – A new study suggests that doctors may want to focus on parents and not just on their patients when it comes to caring for children with autism spectrum disorder. The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, found that parents who were taught specific behavior management skills saw a dramatic improvement in their child’s behavior.

“Seventy percent of the children in the parent training group were rated much improved or very much improved, compared to parents who were only given passive information on autism spectrum disorder,” said Luc Lecavalier, PhD, a psychologist and psychiatrist at the Nisonger Center at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. “Most importantly, nearly 80 percent of these children and these families maintained their gains at the six-month follow-up,” he said.

During the study, parents took part in 11 one-on-one training sessions, and their child’s behavior was evaluated at the end of 24 weeks.

“We know that these techniques work when they’re well done by well-trained professionals. For this study, we taught the parents how to implement those strategies,” Lecavalier said.

Images

(click to download)

A new study suggests doctors may want to focus on parents and not just on their patients when it comes to caring for young children with autism spectrum disorder. Researchers at the Nisonger Center at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and five other sites across the country followed nearly 200 children for almost a year and found when parents were trained to use specific behavior management techniques, 70 percent of children showed considerable improvement. Details of the study here: bit.ly/1NJ1ycW

A new study on young children with autism shows that parents can have a significant impact on their child`s behavior, if they are trained to intervene using specific behavior management techniques. The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, is the largest randomized, multicenter trial of its kind. Researchers at the Nisonger Center at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that 70 percent of parents who were trained by experts on how to manage their child`s serious behavioral problems reported significant improvement. Most importantly, 79 percent of these children maintained improvement six months after the study ended. Details here: bit.ly/1NJ1ycW

Luc Lecavalier, PhD, reviews the findings of a recent study on young children with autism spectrum disorder at the Nisonger Center at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Lecavalier and colleagues from five other sites across the country found that teaching parents specific behavior management techniques effectively reduced serious behavioral problems in young children with autism spectrum disorder. Details: bit.ly/1NJ1ycW

Parents, not patients, are the focus of a newly published study about managing serious disruptive behavior in young children with autism spectrum disorder. Researchers at the Nisonger Center at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center were among six sites across the country that discovered 70 percent of parents who were taught how to manage their child`s behavioral problems also have children who are much better behaved. Details of the study here: bit.ly/1NJ1ycW

The key to helping reduce behavioral problems in young children with autism spectrum disorder may lie with the child`s parents, according to a new study. Researchers from six sites across the U.S., including the Nisonger Center at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, found that 70 percent of young children whose parents were taught specific behavior management techniques showed significant improvement. Details of the study here: bit.ly/1NJ1ycW

Young children who have autism spectrum disorder, like Preston Sheraw, left, may benefit from parents who are taught specific behavior management skills. Researchers at the Nisonger Center at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center were among a team of experts from six sites across the U.S. who followed nearly 200 children for almost a year. They reported significant improvements in children`s serious disruptive behavior and it lasted six months after the study ended. Details on their recently published study here: bit.ly/1NJ1ycW