New Procedure Helps Achilles Tendon Heal Faster

Sports medicine surgeons design a new way to suture injury

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(COLUMBUS, Ohio) March 2015 – From elite athletes to weekend warriors, more than 250,000 Achilles tendon injuries occur every year in the United States, according to The Bone & Joint Journal. Despite the fact that the Achilles is the strongest and thickest connective tissue in the body, it’s also one of the most vulnerable to injury. That is why Dr. Timothy Miller, a sports medicine expert at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, has developed a new surgical technique to repair torn Achilles tendons.

“We’re constantly looking for new and better ways to do surgery, make it safer, make it faster, make it more efficient and minimize the risk of complications,” said Miller. “Given how strong the repair is and the minimal risk of return, or minimal risk of re-tear, I think it will potentially become the gold standard for repair techniques.”

The new procedure strengthens the injury by moving suture knots away from the injury site, unlike the old method which brought together knots at the tear site. This technique avoids healing issues and could soon change how all Achilles repairs are done.

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Dr. Timothy Miller examines a patient`s leg following an Achilles tendon repair with a new suturing technique at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. The procedure used keeps surgical knots away from the tear site so that the injury may heal more quickly and will have a reduced risk of reinjury. Details on the new technique: bit.ly/1zp8mPD

Dr. Timothy Miller checks a patient`s range of motion following a repaired Achilles tendon injury at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. From elite athletes to weekend warriors, hundreds of thousands of Achilles tendon injuries occur every year in the United States. Despite the fact that the Achilles is the strongest and thickest connective tissue in the body, it’s also one of the most vulnerable to injury. Details: bit.ly/1zp8mPD

Miguel Pineda rides an exercise bike during a physical therapy session. He is working to rehabilitate his Achilles tendon following an injury while training for an extreme sports athletic competition. Miguel`s injury was repaired with a new technique developed by sports medicine experts at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Details: bit.ly/1zp8mPD

Former gymnast Miguel Pineda continues to stay in shape while his Achilles tendon injury heals. Sports medicine experts used a new repair method developed at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center to treat Miguel`s injury. This method helps the injured tendon heal more quickly so that patients can get back in the game. Details: bit.ly/1zp8mPD

Miguel Pineda exercises while wearing a leg brace following an Achilles tendon injury. Dr. Timothy Miller, a sports medicine expert at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, developed a new surgical technique to repair torn Achilles tendons. The new procedure strengthens the injury by moving suture knots away from the injury site, unlike the old method which brought together knots at the tear site. Details: bit.ly/1zp8mPD

Miguel Pineda stands smiling atop a warp wall. This training obstacle contributed to both of Miguel`s torn Achilles tendons. Following these injuries, Miguel underwent a new surgical repair method developed at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Details: bit.ly/1zp8mPD