Mysterious Condition Makes It Hard To Swallow

Cases of “EoE” have risen significantly in all ages, puzzled doctors search for cause

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Allergist Dr. Princess Ogbogu examines a patient at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Ogbogu says cases of a mysterious condition are on the rise which causes the esophagus to gradually swell, often to dangerous levels. The condition, known as eosinophilic esophagitis, or EoE, is often triggered by certain foods, though experts believe environmental allergic reactions may also play a role in the swelling of the esophagus. See the symptoms of EoE and how doctors are treating it, here: http://bit.ly/1IDK8bG

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) – Cases of a mysterious condition that makes it progressively harder for people to swallow continue to rise in the U.S., confounding doctors who are working to diagnose and treat it.

“It’s called eosinophilic esophagitis, or EoE for short, and though we don’t have a firm handle on just how many people have it yet, the incidence is rising pretty dramatically, no question,” said Dr. Princess Ogbogu, an allergist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.  “It can get to the point where it’s very debilitating for some patients,” said Ogbogu.

With EoE, immune cells called eosinophils gather in the esophagus, causing it to gradually swell.  Eventually, the esophagus can nearly swell shut and though EoE is not linked directly to food allergies, there is an allergic component to it.  “Certainly foods play a role, but we also think there may be environmental triggers, as well,” said Ogbogu.

The condition affects people of all ages and in worst-case scenarios, some patients actually get food lodged in the esophagus and need to have it removed in the emergency department.

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Allergist Dr. Princess Ogbogu examines a patient at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Ogbogu says cases of a mysterious condition are on the rise which causes the esophagus to gradually swell, often to dangerous levels. The condition, known as eosinophilic esophagitis, or EoE, is often triggered by certain foods, though experts believe environmental allergic reactions may also play a role in the swelling of the esophagus. See the symptoms of EoE and how doctors are treating it, here: http://bit.ly/1IDK8bG

Cases are on the rise nationally of a condition that causes the esophagus to gradually swell, increasing the risk of choking. The condition is called eosinophilic esophagitis, or EoE, and while experts aren`t sure what causes it, doctors at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center believe it may be triggered by a combination of food and environmental allergies. Details on this rare but growing condition, here: http://bit.ly/1IDK8bG

Andy Lutz reads the label of a jar while shopping in Columbus, Ohio. Lutz is one of a growing number of patients diagnosed with EoE, or eosinophilic esophagitis. EoE is a mysterious condition that causes the esophagus to gradually swell, often to dangerous levels. Though it`s not clear what causes EoE, doctors at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center believe it may be triggered by food and even environmental allergies. To learn more click here: http://bit.ly/1IDK8bG

Choking is often a concern at mealtime for Andy Lutz, of Columbus, Ohio. Lutz has EoE, or eosinophilic esophagitis, which causes a gradual swelling of his esophagus. Doctors at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center say cases of this mysterious condition are increasing dramatically, and can be hard to diagnose and treat. To learn more about EoE, click here: http://bit.ly/1IDK8bG

Dr. Princess Ogbogu examines a patient at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Ogbogu says cases of a mysterious condition known as eosinophilic esophagitis, or EoE, are on the rise. EoE causes a gradual but often dangerous swelling of the esophagus. To learn more about the symptoms of EoE and what doctors are doing to try and diagnose and treat it, click here: http://bit.ly/1IDK8bG

A patient swallows a topical steroid under the supervision of Dr. Princess Ogbogu, an allergist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Ogbogu says steroids are one of only a few treatment options for a mysterious condition known as eosinophilic esophagitis, or EoE. The condition causes a patient`s esophagus to gradually swell, increasing the risk of choking. Doctors aren`t sure what causes EoE, but cases are on the rise nationwide. To learn more, click here: http://bit.ly/1IDK8bG